Posted in Don't Forget The Old Ways Reblogs, In The Mountains

The Old Stokermatic


Don't Forget The Old Ways

Daddy built the house that we lived in when we were in the Appalachian Mountains of Kentucky. I was far too young to remember a lot of the particulars, but some things stood out more than others.

Like the way Mom use to pull her old ringer washer out the kitchen door and into the yard with an extension cord to use it. She would put a metal washtub up in a chair to sit underneath the ringer and fill it with water to rinse the clothes in as they came out of the ringer.

I remember the big upright canisters of propane that we used to run our stove that Mom cooked on. I can’t remember what kind of cook stove it was, just that it ran on gas and sure did a fine job cooking a meal.

I remember exactly where everything sat, and how simple it was…

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Posted in Don't Forget The Old Ways Reblogs

Cast Iron Is Still Going Strong


Don't Forget The Old Ways

Cast iron has been used for cooking for over 2000 years. Well, that’s the rumor, but I’m sure it’s close.

As long as there has been a meal to make, apparently, cast iron has been one of the means to get it done.

Since the “stove” did not come along until about the middle of the nineteenth century in Europe, cast iron was about the best thing to cook in over an open fire. (It still is today, in my opinion!)

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Even when cooking got moved indoors, with the addition of fireplaces and hearts, cast iron “spiders” were often used, as well as the hanging dutch oven.

It took me a while to figure out what a spider was, actually. I have always been an avid collector or very old cookbooks and you see a lot about searing and cooking things over an open fire in a spider.

As it…

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